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An original Perry Sportswear A-2 Jacket from a 1942 Army Air Corps contract.
This example is finished in a spray dye of the typical russet brown color.
Note the leather name strip and English-made insignia of the 44th Bombardment Group
"Flying Eight Balls" embroidered on wool felt.

(Charles E. DiSipio - History Preservation Associates)

A magnificent original Bronco Manufacturing A-2 Jacket from a 1942 Army Air Corps contract.
This example is hardly worn and appears to be finished in an aniline dye of the typical russet brown color. Noteworthy are the
angular corners of the pocket bottoms, a feature found on all Bronco-produced A-2's, as well as those of United Sheeplined Clothing Company.
(Marc D. Weinshenker - Acme Depot.Com)

A near-new original J. A. Dubow A-2 Jacket from a 1942 Army Air Corps contract. Other than the
leather name strip on the left breast, this example is in unissued condition. The finish is a spray dye
of the lighter russet brown color commonly found on A-2's of this maker. Noteworthy are the
very wide epaulets and large spec. label at neck area (with size incorporated on label and not
ever found separate from the label), a feature found on all Dubow-produced A-2's of this contract.
(Charles E. DiSipio - History Preservation Associates)

An original Rough Wear Clothing Co. "1401" A-2 Jacket from a 1941 Army Air Corps contract.
The finish is an aniline dye of the lighter russet brown color commonly found on A-2's of this contract. Note the
mottled wear on this A-2, an occurrence typically associated with leather that has been aniline
dyed or lightly spray dyed. The world-famous film actor, James Stewart, wore a Rough Wear A-2 of the
1401 contract during his USAAF service in WWII. Stewart's A-2 is displayed at the USAF museum in Dayton, Ohio.
(Gary Eastman - Eastman Leather Clothing)

This beautiful, original color photo taken in 1941 clearly illustrates an
Army Air Corps fighter pilot wearing a pre-war, light-colored russet brown A-2 jacket
finished in aniline dye. Also note the pre-war, hand-dyed "redskin" B-5 winter flying helmet being buckled up.
(Public Collection)

Another near-new original A-2 Jacket with flawless wool knit parts, produced by Poughkeepsie
Leather Coat Co. from a 1942 Army Air Corps contract. The finish is spray dyed in a russet
brown color and the assembly thread is light olive drab in color. Note the leather name strip on left breast and
AAF full-color winged star decal on left shoulder sleeve (indicating tail-end 1943 or early 1944 delivery to the AAF).
(Marc D. Weinshenker - Acme Depot.Com)

An unbelievable example of an original early B-3 jacket manufactured by HLB Corp.
that has survived over sixty years without being issued!!! The supple, russet brown, hand-dyed hides
and plush sheep wool leap out at you. As it was in 1941, this B-3 jacket is NEW!!! Noteworthy:
the early, nickel-plated chain hanger in neck and right cuff made of sheepskin
finished in dark brown. This B-3 may well have been one of the last ever made in
"redskin", as the dark brown, spray-dyed cuff indicates this newer finish was just coming into use.
(Charles E. DiSipio - History Preservation Associates)

THIS WAS THE AIR CORPS ... No wonder the aviator has been immortalized as THE romantic hero
of the 20th century! This is a magnificent, original color photo of the "driver" of a P-40B or C fighter
plane taken in 1941. The unmistakable, gorgeous russet brown color and mottled finish of the
hand- dyed, early "redskin" B-3 jackets is superbly illustrated here. Also noteworthy is
his early flying gear: B-7 goggles, A-8 helmet and A-8A oxygen mask.
(Public Collection)

Produced by HLB Corp, this is a very rare transitional B-3 in the very early 1942 pattern with sleeves
made of leftover hand-dyed "redskin" russet brown sheepskin from the last 1941 production runs. The jacket
body is made of dark brown spray-dyed skins and the sleeve reinforcements and pocket are dark brown goatskin.
(Marc D. Weinshenker - Acme Depot.Com)

A superb example of a 1942-pattern B-3 produced by Werber Sportswear with two-tone russet
brown trim and sleeve reinforcements. Noteworthy: the leather hanger in neck area,
a factory-installed russet brown cuff on left sleeve, and deep, golden-brown sheep wool.
Wool coloring can vary considerably on original sheepskin jackets, the darker hues found on
this example are largely a result of the type of tanning process used at the time.
(Charles E. DiSipio - History Preservation Associates)

A spectacular example of an original 1942-pattern
B-3 jacket manufactured by HLB Corp. that remains unworn and unissued!!! The supple, dark brown,
spray-dyed hides and plush sheep wool leap out at you. As it was in 1942, this B-3 jacket is
NEW!!! The sleeve reinforcements, pocket and all seam taping are made of dark brown goatskin.
The deep-hued, golden-brown sheep wool is largely a result of vegetable tanning.
(Charles E. DiSipio - History Preservation Associates)

A 1942-pattern B-3 jacket with russet brown sleeves and trimming is worn by this navigator
in an original color photo taken in early 1942. Noteworthy details include the russet brown, hand
dyed "redskin" cuffs on the B-3, which were fashioned at the factory from remnant scraps of the
last of the pre-war sheepskin, and the very early B-3 life vest without the leather, puncture-proof reinforcement on the chest.
(Public Collection)

An extremely rare, early B-6 jacket manufactured in the "redskin" russet brown
hand-dyed sheepskin of thepre-1942 period. This B-6 is in remarkably outstanding
condition, complete with leather name strip and foil-on-leather rank of a Lt. Col.
(Charles E. DiSipio - History Preservation Associates)

This B-6 jacket is manufactured in the dark brown spray-dyed sheepskin of the post-1941 period.
This example was produced in the first months of 1942 and is in superb
condition, still remaining soft and flexible and showing no signs of age or wear.
(Charles E. DiSipio - History Preservation Associates)

A superb USN M-422A jacket manufactured by H&L Block Corp. The USN Intermediate
Flying Jackets produced in the 1940's exhibit the same sort of manufacturer variation as
found on the USAAF A-2 jackets. Compare this M-422A with the example produced by Gordon & Ferguson below.
(Charles E. DiSipio - History Preservation Associates)

Another superb USN M-422A jacket, this time manufactured by the highly regarded
Gordon & Ferguson Co. Note the over-sized left pocket and pointy collar, both distinguishing
characteristics of this particular manufacturer. A very large enlisted ranks leather name plate is sewn to the left breast area.
(Charles E. DiSipio - History Preservation Associates)

A USAAF B-10 jacket that is in absolutely spectacular condition, although
issued and worn by a 9th Air Force flight surgeon during WWII. This example was
manufactured by Oldin-Dennis, one of the larger producers of B-10 jackets, whose cotton outer shell color is
more distinctly green rather than olive green.
(Charles E. DiSipio - History Preservation Associate)

This B-10 jacket saw action in the SWPA with the 5th Air Force in WWII. The insignia of the
5th Air Force and the squadron number have been hand painted on the breast areas of the jacket.
The jacket shows average wear and age, including a well-mothed wool knit waist band and cuffs. This example
was produced by LSL Garment Corp. and features a spec. label in the neck area with brown
lettering on an off-white background, rather than the typical gold lettering on black. It is constructed
of a rather heavy and coarse cotton fabric that, along with the brown-on-white label, indicates a late-production B-10.
(Reto Kleinpeter, Japan, via Acme Depot.Com)